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Results of South African matrics are up by 7%

South African students writing the national matric exams in 2010 managed to score a 67.8% pass rate – a 7.2 % improvement on the results from 2009, despite schooldays lost to the Fifa Soccer World Cup and the prolonged public servant’s strike in 2010.

All the provinces registered a marked improvement on the 2009 results:

  • Gauteng: 78.6% (71.8% in 2009)
  • Western Cape: 76.8% (75.7% in 2009)
  • North West: 75.7% (67.5% in 2009)
  • Northern Cape: 72.3% (61% in 2009)
  • KwaZulu-Natal: 70.7% (61.1% in 2009)
  • Free State: 70.7% (69.4% in 2009)
  • Eastern Cape: 58.3% (51% in 2009)
  • Limpopo: 57.9% (48.9% in 2009)
  • Mpumalanga: 56.8% (47.9% in 2009)

Education specialists though are divided on the question of whether such an unexpectedly huge improvement is educationally both believable and reliable as a true indicator of pupils’ aptitudes.

Questions also remain about the performance of children in rural and township schools, in particular whether these  disadvantaged pupils recorded similarly vast increases in achievement.

To read more:
Go to the article on MediaClubSouthAfrica.com by Clicking Here!
Go to David MacFarlane and Kamogelo Seekoei’s article in the Mail and Guardian by Clicking Here!

Click Here to read the SA government’s Report on the National Senior Certificate Examination Results
All the results and profiles of the top schools and students can be found at  IEB microsite
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Minister of Basic Education cracks the whip on Matric results

“The decline in the national matric pass rate of 62.5 % to 60.6 % is marginal but depressing”, the South African Minister of Basic Education, Angie Motshekga recently said after the release of the 2009 matric results. According to her she is disappointed and has sleepless nights because the Department of Basic Education is not where is should be.

The 2009 pass rates for the respective provinces were as follows:

  • Western Cape: 75.7%
  • Gauteng: 71.8 %
  • Free State: 69.4 %
  • Northwest: 67.5 %
  • Northern Cape: 61.3 %
  • KwaZulu-Natal: 61.1 %
  • Eastern Cape: 51 %
  • Limpopo: 48.9 %
  • Mpumalanga: 47.9%

She announced a sectoral blueprint plan that will be developed before the end of March 2010, to ensure a turn around of the education system, and to address ineffective education.

She said urgent steps are needed to improve the quality of education. Schools and teachers need more and better support and training, and better infrastructure and timely delivery of handbooks. Motshekga also suggested direct interventions in schools and the co-opting of experts that can help strenghten systems.

To read the original article written by Alet Rademeyer in Afrikaans in the Beeld Newspaper Click Here!

A controversy around the real SA matric pass rate

The real matric pass rate was only 36.2 % according to the South African Institute of Race Relations (SAIRR), and not 62,5 % as cited by the Minister of Education, Naledi Pandor.

The Institute’s South African Survey shows that in 2007 there were 920 716 pupils in Grade 11. Only 64 % of those pupils went on to write their matric examinations in 2008. Of these only 333 681 or 36.2 % of the original 2007 group passed matric in 2008.

To read the SAIRR’s 18 Jan 2009 press release on the matric pass rate Click Here!

To read an article on the matric pass rate in the Beeld, an Afrikaans newspaper Click Here!

The Great Maths Debate

The South African National Department of Education has released an article on the debate surrounding the 2008 matric mathematics results.

To read the article Click Here!

The National Department of Education releases Abridged Report on the 2008 matric results

The South African National Department of Education released an Abridged Report on the 2008 National Senior Certificate Examination Results on 30 December 2008.

To read the Report  Click Here!