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Reaction to 2011 Matric results

Reaction to South Africa’s 2011 matric results have been varied. The 70.2 % national senior certificate pass rate was welcomed by government and some analysts. This positive response was understandable given that it is the first time since 2004 that more than 70 % of students passed.

However many analysts sketched a different picture. The total number of matric candidates dropped from 537 543 in 2010 to 496 090 in 2011. This means a drop of 8% or 41 453 students. Another statistic analysts pointed out is that of the 923 463 students that started grade 1 in the year 2000, only 496090 sat for the matric exams in 2011, which means the “true pass rate” is actually 38 %.

Afriforum pinned the problem on the lack of mother-tongue education, while Jonathan Clarke told the Mail & Guardian that there is anecdotal evidence that schools are rushing low achieving students through lower grades and then hold them back in Grade 10 or 11. Other analysts criticised the low level at which matric can be passed. To pass matric students had to achieve 40 % in their home language, 40 % in two other subjects and 30% in three subjects.

To read more go to Greg Nicolson’s article on DailyMaverick by Clicking Here!

To read Michelle Jones’ article in the Cape Times Click Here!

 To read Jonathan Jansen’s article on IOL news Click Here!

To read Faranaaz Parker’s article in the Mail & Guardian Click Here!

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Survey shows an increase in South Africans with formal qualifications

The 2010 General Household Survey recently released by Statistics South Africa shows some very interesting statistics:
  • South Africans with a matric or Grade 12 education increased from 21.5% in 2002 to 26.2% in 2010.
  • Persons with a tertiary qualification also increased from 9.2% in 2002 to 11.2% in 2010.
  • Persons with no formal education decreased from 10.8% (2002) to 7% (2010).
  • Functionally illiterate persons (highest level of education lower than Grade 7) decreased from 27.9% to 19.2%.
  • Provinces with the highest percentages of persons without a formal education were: Limpopo (13.4%), Mpumalanga (11.3%), Northern Cape (10.9%) and North West (10.2%).
Information obtained from I-Net Bridge on Business Report, Click Here!
To read the General Household Survey of 2010, Click Here!
 

Pupils from Model C schools doing better

The latest South Africa Survey recently released by the South African Institute for Race Relations have found amongst others that Model C schools (former whites-only schools) were still setting the pace for quality education. Race was found to be less important as a factor of scholastic achievement than the type of school a child attends. The matric rate for blacks in Model C schools in 2009 was 88%, compared to only 55% overall in all government schools. Coloured pupils in Model C schools achieved an 88 % pass rate compared to 76% overall while Indian pupils achieved 98 % compared to 92 % overall.

To read more go to Deon de Lange’s Mercury article on IOL by Clicking Here!

South African matric is a good solid qualification, according to Umalusi

South Africa’s matric is “exactly where it should be”, according to research comparing it to foreign qualifications, education monitoring body Umalusi says.

“The South African public can be reassured that the National Senior Certificate (NSC) is a good, solid, robust qualification,” Elizabeth Burroughs, a senior manager at Umalusi, said in Johannesburg at the release of a report on the international standing of South Africa’s matric.

To read more go to the Sapa article on Times Live by Clicking Here!

To read the Umalusi Report Click Here!

South African pupils too old for school?

A recent national household survey on Access to education undertaken by Social Surveys Africa and the Centre for Applied Legal Studies (Cals) suggests that 10 % of pupils across all grades are three or more years outside the age-grade norm. Only 4% of children aged seven to 18 are not in school though.

This raises a question: if 96 % of our children are in school, why are our matric completion rates so dismal?  The survey showed that one of the reasons we have such high attendance rates for the ages seven to 18 is that learners take a long time to get through the schooling system. Just because you are in school at the age of 18 does not mean you are in grade 12.

To read more go to Sarah Meny-Gibert’ analysis in the Mail & Guardian by Clicking Here! 

To access the report of the Survey Click Here!

The Great Maths Debate

The South African National Department of Education has released an article on the debate surrounding the 2008 matric mathematics results.

To read the article Click Here!

Questionmark over quality of matric maths pass rate

“The 2008 mathematics results do not necessarily reflect real improvement in mathematics education in SA, said a group of the subject teachers at the weekend.” This according to an article published in the Pretoria News on 5 January, 2008. 

To read the original article Click Here!