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Metcalfe Report on Verification of Textbook Deliveries in Limpopo, released

The investigation team, led by former higher education director general Mary Metcalfe, aimed at verifying how many textbooks Limpopo schools have received, were unable to make an accurate assessment of how many books have reached schools as yet.

The team measured deliveries at 10% of the province’s 4 000 schools under the watchful eye of unions, the Congress of South African Students, school governing body associations and the South African Principals’ Association.

Although the team could not complete a full audit of deliveries it did present some “very concerning” findings.

The team found that as of July 3 “only 48% of the books had been delivered to the schools, with 52% of the books still sitting in the district warehouse”, despite claims by the government Department of Basic Education, at a joint briefing with Section 27 on June 28, that approximately 98% of textbooks had been delivered to schools.

To read more go to Victoria John’s article in the Mail & Guardian by Clicking Here!

To download the Metcalfe Report Click Here!

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SARUA brings out a new report on Higher Education in the SADC region

The Southern African Regional Universities Association(SARUA) recently brought out a report on Higher Education in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. The report is titled Building Higher education Scenarios 2025: a strategic agenda for development in SADC.

To download the report Click Here!

It is possible to reform South Africa’s school system in 6 years – CDE report shows

A report by the Centre for Development and Enterprise (CDE) shows that it is possible to to reform South Africa’s schooling system within 6 years.

“The country needs bold political leadership and a new social compact to improve the quality of schooling”, Ann Bernstein, executive director of CDE said when the report was released recently. The report, “School reform is possible: lessons for South Africa from international experience” summarises discussions that were held with experts from Brazil, Ghana, India and the United States, where significant schooling reforms were implemented.

More information on this can be found in the following articles:

To download the Report Click Here!

Education departments are failing to deliver basic services to primary schools

A report released by Transparency International (TI) titled “Mapping Transparency, Accountability, and Integrity in Primary Education in South Africa” shows that provincial education departments in South Africa are failing to deliver solid basic services to primary schools in South Africa.

The report found that schools received their budget allocations late, resulting in schools not having the required means to run their services effectively, and this had particular impact on the poorer non-fee-paying schools.

The report also showed that there was poor enforcement of rules and regulations by education departments, which led to weaknesses in the effectiveness and legitimacy of their work.

Other issued raised was:

  • concern by schools’ leadership over embezzlement at provincial level
  • low levels of participation, accountability and transparency at school level
  • lack of of participation and support from parents
  • staff absenteeism
  • infrastructure (15 % of schools had no electricity and 10% no water supply; one out of two learners indicated that they are not always provided with a desk)
  • sexual harassment and safety (one out of four learners felt that schools are unsafe and that rape and violence are major problems)
  • lack of knowledge of rules and regulations governing some key transactions at school level

To read the original SAPA article on News24 Click Here!

To read the report “Mapping Transparency, Accountability, and Integrity in Primary Education in South Africa” , Click Here!

The South African family is in crisis according to an SAIRR Report

South African families are in crisis according to a recent report released by the South African Institute of Race Relations. The report “The First Steps to Healing the South African Family”, documents the extent of family breakdown in South Africa and the effect this is having on children and the youth.

Some of the statistics that can be found in the report are:

  • Of the 9.1 million double orphans in Sub-Saharan Africa in 2005, around 5.2 million (almost 60%) had lost at least one of their parents to AIDS
  • South Africa has 859 000 double orphans (children who have lost both parents) (2008 figures)
  • South Africa has 2 468 000 paternal orphans (2008 figures)
  • South Africa has 624 000 maternal orphans (2008 figures)
  • 3.95 million children in South Africa had lost 1 or both parents by 2008 which means an increase of about one third since 2002
  • Almost half of all orphans and two-thirds of double orphans in South Africa were between the ages of 12 and 17 years
  •  481 994 double orphans were enrolled in ordinary schools in South Africa in 2008
  • 1 661 275 children whose mother or father had died were enrolled in ordinary schools in South Africa in 2008
  • Medical Research Council’s estimates in 2002 were that in 2015 some 5 700 000 children in Southern Africa would have lost one or both parents to AIDS

To more go to TimesLive’s article by Clicking Here!

To download the full report Click Here!

New UNESCO Report “The hidden crisis: armed conflict and education”

UNESCO has released the 2011 EFA Global Monitoring Report, ‘The hidden crisis: Armed conflict and education.’ This report analyses the devastating effects of conflict on education.

To download the report Click Here!

South Africa needs more PhD graduates

Bold intervention is needed to increase the number of PhD graduates in South Africa, a study released recently by the Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAF) has found.

The production of doctorates in the country had been stable for several years, ASSAF’s Professor Jonathan Jansen said in Johannesburg at the presentation of a study on demands for high-level skills in an emerging economy.

“In the context of current systems and capacity at South African universities, there is little hope that rapid growth in high-level qualifications at the level of the doctorate will materialise in the foreseeable future.”

The report was produced by an expert study panel, led by Jansen, and showed among other things that South Africa’s production of PhDs per million of the population, 26 PhD graduates yearly per million, compared poorly with other countries such as Portugal (569 per million) and Australia (264 per million) per annum.

To read more go to Phumza Sokana’s article on IOL News by Clicking Here!

To read the report on PhD graduates in South Africa by the Academy of Science of South Africa Click Here!